Swedish doctors transplant nine wombs

The women were born without a uterus or had it removed because of cervical cancer. Most are in their 30s and are part of the first major experiment to test if it is possible to transplant wombs into women so they can give birth to their own children.

"This is a new kind of surgery," Dr Mats Brannstrom said. "We have no textbook to look at."

Dr Brannstrom, chair of the obstetrics and gynaecology department at the University of Gothenburg, is leading the initiative. Next month, he and colleagues will run the first-ever workshop on how to perform womb transplants and they plan to publish a scientific report on their efforts soon.

He said the nine womb recipients were doing well. Many already menstruated six weeks after the transplants, an early sign that the wombs are healthy and functioning.

One woman had an infection in her newly received uterus and others had some minor rejection episodes, but none of the recipients or donors needed

Latest

Trending