Management of allergic rhinitis

Early intervention with immunotherapy may alter the natural history of allergic rhinitis

Early intervention with immunotherapy may alter the natural history of allergic rhinitis.

Allergic rhinitis is a common condition of childhood and young adult life.

It is rare during infancy but is estimated to affect about one in 16 children aged 6-7 years, one in 10 children aged 13-14 years and about one in five adults.1,2

Once established, symptoms generally persist for at least 10 years.3,4

The typical symptoms of allergic rhinitis are readily recognised: an itchy nose with clear rhinorrhoea, sneezing and nasal congestion.

Some patients may also have a cough secondary to postnasal drip, a symptom that can be mistaken for asthma.

Although common, allergic rhinitis in children can cause significant impairment in concentration, behaviour, sleep, learning capacity and/or ability to play sports.

Complications include exacerbation of

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